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Oxylator® Product Series
Overview
Oxylator® EM-100
Introduction
Brochure (PDF)
Operating Manual (PDF)
Algorithms and Charts
Components



Disassembly for Cleaning



Comparison of Features among Ventilation Devices


How to Use Effectively
Photographs
Publications


Patents, Approvals, and Clearances
Case Studies



St. Gallen Cantonal Hospital, Switzerland (PDF)



Hospital Princeps d'Espanya Bellvitge, Barcelona, Spain



Royal Victoria Hospital and McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada



Montérégie's EMS System, Longueil, QC, Canada



NTV a Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Anesthesi- medewerkers, Netherlands



Helicopter Emergency Medical Services, University Hospital Rotterdam, Netherlands



University of Massachussetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA, U.S.A.



Emergency Scientific Medical Center, Yerevan, Armenia


CPR Medical Devices Inc., Toronto, ON, Canada
Testimonials


Carter County Emergency & Rescue Squad, Inc., Elizabethton, TN, U.S.A.


University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA, U.S.A.


U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, Dublin, GA, U.S.A.


Croft Rescue Squad, Spartanburg, SC, U.S.A.


Lenoir Memorial Hospital, Kinston, NC, U.S.A.


Dunn Rescue Squad, Inc., Dunn, NC, U.S.A.

Jefferson County EMS, Dandridge, TN, U.S.A.
Oxylator® FR-300
Introduction
Brochure (PDF)
Operating Manual (PDF)
Usage Guide
Photographs
Publications


Patents, Approvals, and Clearances
Case Studies


St. Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg, NL (PDF)

University of Massachussetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, U.S.A. (PDF)
Oxylator® EMX
Introduction
Brochure (PDF)
Operating Manual (PDF)
Usage Guide
Photographs
Publications

Patents, Approvals, and Clearances
Oxylator® HD
Introduction
Brochure (PDF)
Operating Manual (PDF)
Photographs
Publications
Case Studies


St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada (PDF)

Patents, Approvals, and Clearances
Distributors
Demonstration Videos
Brochures
Oxylator® EM-100 (PDF)
Oxylator® FR-300 (PDF)
Oxylator® EMX (PDF)
Oxylator® HD (PDF)
Operating Manuals
Oxylator® EM-100 (PDF)
Oxylator® FR-300 (PDF)
Oxylator® EMX (PDF)
Oxylator® HD (PDF)
Usage Guides
Oxylator® FR-300 (PDF)
Oxylator® EMX (PDF)
Publications
Oxylator® EM-100
Oxylator® FR-300
Oxylator® EMX
Oxylator® HD
Case Studies
Oxylator® EM-100


St. Gallen Cantonal Hospital, Switzerland (PDF)


Hospital Princeps d'Espanya Bellvitge, Barcelona, Spain


Royal Victoria Hospital and McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada


Montérégie's EMS System, Longueil, QC, Canada


NTV a Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Anesthesi- medewerkers, Netherlands


Helicopter Emergency Medical Services, University Hospital Rotterdam, Netherlands


University of Massachussetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA, U.S.A.


Emergency Scientific Medical Center, Yerevan, Armenia

CPR Medical Devices, Inc., Toronto, ON, Canada
Oxylator® FR-300


St. Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg, NL (PDF)

University of Massachussetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, U.S.A. (PDF)
Oxylator® HD
St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada (PDF)
Testimonials
Oxylator® EM-100

Carter County Emergency & Rescue Squad, Inc., Elizabethton, TN, U.S.A.

University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA, U.S.A.

U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, Dublin, GA, U.S.A.

Croft Rescue Squad, Spartanburg, SC, U.S.A.

Lenoir Memorial Hospital, Kinston, NC, U.S.A.

Dunn Rescue Squad, Inc., Dunn, NC, U.S.A.
Jefferson County EMS, Dandridge, TN, U.S.A.
Distributors
Demonstration Videos
News and Newsworthy

Helicopter Emergency Medical Services, University Hospital Rotterdam, Netherlands
REA 2000, Ostschweizer Bildungsaustellung, St. Gallen, Switzerland
Downloads
Brochures
Operating Manuals
Usage Guides
Publications
Demonstration Videos
FAQs
Acknowledgments
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Features
Oxylator® outperforms bag-valve, in the European Journal of Anaesthesiology Oxylators® reviewed in the Journal of Emergency Medical Services
Oxylator® bests bag-valve in peer-review studies Oxylators® reviewed in JEMS magazine
Four Modes of Operation of the Oxylator® EM-100

1. Manually-activated Cycle for Non-breathing Patient
Manual Mode. Plots of flow (lower) and airway pressure (upper) against time for one cycle. The mode is simulated on an adult lung. The inhalator button is closed off so that there is no flow in the system. No noise or flow should emanate from the EM-100. Depress the O2 button and the airway pressure increases from a baseline airway pressure (PAW) of zero up to the preset pressure chosen on the EM-100 (in this case 28 cmH2O) as long as the O2 button remains firmly depressed. Once the airway pressure reaches the preset limit chosen, the EM-100 shuts of the flow which is associated with a loud click. Let the O2 button go and the airway pressure will fall rapidly. An I:E ratio of approximately 1:1 is attained. If you do not let the button go, the airway pressure will fall more slowly as if the unit was engaged in automatic or continuous cycling mode
Automatic or Continuous Cycling Mode. Plots of flow (upper) and airway pressure (lower) against time. Mode is simulated on an adult lung. The inhalator button is turned off. The action by the operator is the same as in manual mode
Manual Mode. Plots of flow (lower) and airway pressure (upper) against time for one cycle. The mode is simulated on an adult lung. The inhalator button is closed off so that there is no flow in the system. No noise or flow should emanate from the EM-100. Depress the O2 button and the airway pressure increases from a baseline airway pressure (PAW) of zero up to the preset pressure chosen on the EM-100 (in this case 28 cmH2O) as long as the O2 button remains firmly depressed. Once the airway pressure reaches the preset limit chosen, the EM-100 shuts of the flow which is associated with a loud click. Let the O2 button go and the airway pressure will fall rapidly. An I:E ratio of approximately 1:1 is attained. If you do not let the button go, the airway pressure will fall more slowly as if the unit was engaged in automatic or continuous cycling mode, elongating the expiratory time. At the end of the E phase a loud click will alert you that the E phase is complete and that the airway pressure has returned to a baseline airway pressure of zero. Until the O2 button is depressed again, the flow will remain shut off and the airway pressure will remain at zero. Start a new cycle if you desire. The flow jumps instantly from zero to just under 40 litres per minute the moment the O2 button is depressed. It stays there creating a horizontal line as long as there is flow, indicating a 'square wave' or a consistent constant flow until the system is shut off. The little bump exceeding the horizontal line at the beginning indicates that the transducers of the lung simulator cannot electronically measure the initial burst of flow accurately.
, with the exception that the O2 button has to be continuously depressed or turned to the 'locked in' position. The EM-100 cycles continuously between the I and E phase with a PEEP of 2-4 cmH2O at the end of the E phase. The I:E ratio is from 1:1 to 1:2.
, elongating the expiratory time. At the end of the E phase a loud click will alert you that the E phase is complete and that the airway pressure has returned to a baseline airway pressure of zero. Until the O2 button is depressed again, the flow will remain shut off and the airway pressure will remain at zero. Start a new cycle if you desire. The flow jumps instantly from zero to just under 40 litres per minute the moment the O2 button is depressed. It stays there creating a horizontal line as long as there is flow, indicating a 'square wave' or a consistent constant flow until the system is shut off. The little bump exceeding the horizontal line at the beginning indicates that the transducers of the lung simulator cannot electronically measure the initial burst of flow accurately.
— Inspiratory flow can be initiated for a single cycle by depressing the oxygen release button (1
Inspiratory flow can be initiated for a single cycle by depressing the oxygen release button (1) and holding it down until the Oxylator® EM-100 releases at the end of the inspiratory phase, or until chest expansion is considered sufficient for adequate ventilatory exchange and the oxygen release button (1) is let go. Passive exhalation will then take place. The inspiratory phase should be restricted to 2 seconds in an adult and 1 second in a child.
) and holding it down until the Oxylator® EM-100 releases at the end of the inspiratory phase, or until chest expansion is considered sufficient for adequate ventilatory exchange and the oxygen release button (1
Inspiratory flow can be initiated for a single cycle by depressing the oxygen release button (1) and holding it down until the Oxylator® EM-100 releases at the end of the inspiratory phase, or until chest expansion is considered sufficient for adequate ventilatory exchange and the oxygen release button (1) is let go. Passive exhalation will then take place. The inspiratory phase should be restricted to 2 seconds in an adult and 1 second in a child.
) is let go. Passive exhalation will then take place. The inspiratory phase should be restricted to 2 seconds in an adult and 1 second in a child. The level of pressure is set by rotating the pressure release selector (10
The level of pressure is set by rotating the pressure release selector (10) to the desired value.
) to the desired value. A new inspiratory cycle can then be initiated by depressing the oxygen release button (1
A new inspiratory cycle can then be initiated by depressing the oxygen release button (1) once again upon completion of exhalation. This mode will not maintain a baseline pressure (PEEP) and upon complete exhalation the airway pressure will be at 0 cmH2O.
) once again upon completion of exhalation. This mode will not maintain a baseline pressure (PEEP) and upon complete exhalation the airway pressure will be at 0 cmH2O. The Oxylator® EM-100 will cycle as in 'continuous mode' if the oxygen release button (1
The Oxylator® EM-100 will cycle as in 'continuous mode' if the oxygen release button (1) is held depressed constantly as in mode 2
) is held depressed constantly as in mode 2.
2. Continuous Cycle with Baseline Pressure (PEEP)
Automatic or Continuous Cycling Mode. Plots of flow (upper) and airway pressure (lower) against time. Mode is simulated on an adult lung. The inhalator button is turned off. The action by the operator is the same as in manual mode
Manual Mode. Plots of flow (lower) and airway pressure (upper) against time for one cycle. The mode is simulated on an adult lung. The inhalator button is closed off so that there is no flow in the system. No noise or flow should emanate from the EM-100. Depress the O2 button and the airway pressure increases from a baseline airway pressure (PAW) of zero up to the preset pressure chosen on the EM-100 (in this case 28 cmH2O) as long as the O2 button remains firmly depressed. Once the airway pressure reaches the preset limit chosen, the EM-100 shuts of the flow which is associated with a loud click. Let the O2 button go and the airway pressure will fall rapidly. An I:E ratio of approximately 1:1 is attained. If you do not let the button go, the airway pressure will fall more slowly as if the unit was engaged in automatic or continuous cycling mode, elongating the expiratory time. At the end of the E phase a loud click will alert you that the E phase is complete and that the airway pressure has returned to a baseline airway pressure of zero. Until the O2 button is depressed again, the flow will remain shut off and the airway pressure will remain at zero. Start a new cycle if you desire. The flow jumps instantly from zero to just under 40 litres per minute the moment the O2 button is depressed. It stays there creating a horizontal line as long as there is flow, indicating a 'square wave' or a consistent constant flow until the system is shut off. The little bump exceeding the horizontal line at the beginning indicates that the transducers of the lung simulator cannot electronically measure the initial burst of flow accurately.
, with the exception that the O2 button has to be continuously depressed or turned to the 'locked in' position. The EM-100 cycles continuously between the I and E phase with a PEEP of 2-4 cmH2O at the end of the E phase. The I:E ratio is from 1:1 to 1:2.
for Non-breathing Patient (should only be engaged when the inspiratory time does not exceed 2 seconds in an adult or 1 second in a child) — The system will cycle continuously when the oxygen release button (1
The system will cycle continuously when the oxygen release button (1) is either continually depressed or held down and then rotated clockwise to seal and activate oxygen flow. This function overrides the inhalation mode automatically.
) is either continually depressed or held down and then rotated clockwise to seal and activate oxygen flow. This function overrides the inhalation mode automatically. The Oxylator® EM-100 will cycle from an inspiratory to expiratory cycle maintaining positive airway pressure throughout the cycle with a baseline pressure (PEEP) value of 2 to 4 cmH2O. The system will end the inspiratory cycle upon reaching the preset maximum airway pressure level indicated by the pressure release selector (10
The system will end the inspiratory cycle upon reaching the preset maximum airway pressure level indicated by the pressure release selector (10).
). This allows unassisted passive exhalation to take place until the expiratory flow diminishes to a level of 2 to 4 cmH2O PEEP. Then Oxylator® EM-100 will automatically start a new inspiratory cycle. When an operator observes an abnormally long inspiratory phase (greater than 2 seconds in an adult or greater than 1 second in a child), the Oxylator® EM-100 should only be used in manually activated cycles. See mode 1.
3. Manually-activated Cycle with Baseline Pressure (PEEP)
Manual Mode with PEEP. Plots of flow (lower) and airway pressure (upper) against time. Mode is simulated on a adult lung. The operator performs the same actions as in manual mode
Manual Mode. Plots of flow (lower) and airway pressure (upper) against time for one cycle. The mode is simulated on an adult lung. The inhalator button is closed off so that there is no flow in the system. No noise or flow should emanate from the EM-100. Depress the O2 button and the airway pressure increases from a baseline airway pressure (PAW) of zero up to the preset pressure chosen on the EM-100 (in this case 28 cmH2O) as long as the O2 button remains firmly depressed. Once the airway pressure reaches the preset limit chosen, the EM-100 shuts of the flow which is associated with a loud click. Let the O2 button go and the airway pressure will fall rapidly. An I:E ratio of approximately 1:1 is attained. If you do not let the button go, the airway pressure will fall more slowly as if the unit was engaged in automatic or continuous cycling mode
Automatic or Continuous Cycling Mode. Plots of flow (upper) and airway pressure (lower) against time. Mode is simulated on an adult lung. The inhalator button is turned off. The action by the operator is the same as in manual mode
Manual Mode. Plots of flow (lower) and airway pressure (upper) against time for one cycle. The mode is simulated on an adult lung. The inhalator button is closed off so that there is no flow in the system. No noise or flow should emanate from the EM-100. Depress the O2 button and the airway pressure increases from a baseline airway pressure (PAW) of zero up to the preset pressure chosen on the EM-100 (in this case 28 cmH2O) as long as the O2 button remains firmly depressed. Once the airway pressure reaches the preset limit chosen, the EM-100 shuts of the flow which is associated with a loud click. Let the O2 button go and the airway pressure will fall rapidly. An I:E ratio of approximately 1:1 is attained. If you do not let the button go, the airway pressure will fall more slowly as if the unit was engaged in automatic or continuous cycling mode, elongating the expiratory time. At the end of the E phase a loud click will alert you that the E phase is complete and that the airway pressure has returned to a baseline airway pressure of zero. Until the O2 button is depressed again, the flow will remain shut off and the airway pressure will remain at zero. Start a new cycle if you desire. The flow jumps instantly from zero to just under 40 litres per minute the moment the O2 button is depressed. It stays there creating a horizontal line as long as there is flow, indicating a 'square wave' or a consistent constant flow until the system is shut off. The little bump exceeding the horizontal line at the beginning indicates that the transducers of the lung simulator cannot electronically measure the initial burst of flow accurately.
, with the exception that the inhalator button needs to be turned on to create PEEP (positive end expiratory pressure) of a few cmH2O. Therefore, there will always be PEEP, even when the expiratory cycle is complete. The inhalation mode can be overridden any time by depressing the O2 button. The upper plot shows this nicely.
, elongating the expiratory time. At the end of the E phase a loud click will alert you that the E phase is complete and that the airway pressure has returned to a baseline airway pressure of zero. Until the O2 button is depressed again, the flow will remain shut off and the airway pressure will remain at zero. Start a new cycle if you desire. The flow jumps instantly from zero to just under 40 litres per minute the moment the O2 button is depressed. It stays there creating a horizontal line as long as there is flow, indicating a 'square wave' or a consistent constant flow until the system is shut off. The little bump exceeding the horizontal line at the beginning indicates that the transducers of the lung simulator cannot electronically measure the initial burst of flow accurately.
, with the exception that the inhalator button needs to be turned on to create PEEP (positive end expiratory pressure) of a few cmH2O. Therefore, there will always be PEEP, even when the expiratory cycle is complete. The inhalation mode can be overridden any time by depressing the O2 button. The upper plot shows this nicely.
for Non-breathing Patient — The system will maintain a baseline pressure (PEEP) if the inhalator knob (13
The system will maintain a baseline pressure (PEEP) if the inhalator knob (13) is opened counterclockwise and the Oxylator® EM-100 is operated as in mode 1. This will provide a baseline pressure (PEEP) of 2 to 4 cmH2O.
) is opened counterclockwise and the Oxylator® EM-100 is operated as in mode 1. This will provide a baseline pressure (PEEP) of 2 to 4 cmH2O.
4. Inhalation of Oxygen Enriched Ambient Air for Breathing Patient — The system can be used in this mode by rotating the inhalator knob (13
The system can be used in this mode by rotating the inhalator knob (13) counterclockwise which will allow the air to be enriched with oxygen as a patient breathes on his/her own.
) counterclockwise which will allow the air to be enriched with oxygen as a patient breathes on his/her own. The oxygen release button (1
The oxygen release button (1) cannot be in a depressed position in the inhalation mode.
) cannot be in a depressed position in the inhalation mode.
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