CPR Medical Devices, Inc. CPR Medical Devices, Inc.
CPR Medical Devices, Inc.
CPR Medical Devices Inc. address
E-mail CPR Medical Devices Inc.
 
Search

Menu Tools: Open All  Close All  Locate  Move Previous  Move Next 

Home
Oxylator® Product Series
Overview
Oxylator® EM-100
Introduction
Brochure (PDF)
Operating Manual (PDF)
Algorithms and Charts
Components



Disassembly for Cleaning



Comparison of Features among Ventilation Devices


How to Use Effectively
Photographs
Publications


Patents, Approvals, and Clearances
Case Studies



St. Gallen Cantonal Hospital, Switzerland (PDF)



Hospital Princeps d'Espanya Bellvitge, Barcelona, Spain



Royal Victoria Hospital and McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada



Montérégie's EMS System, Longueil, QC, Canada



NTV a Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Anesthesi- medewerkers, Netherlands



Helicopter Emergency Medical Services, University Hospital Rotterdam, Netherlands



University of Massachussetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA, U.S.A.



Emergency Scientific Medical Center, Yerevan, Armenia


CPR Medical Devices Inc., Toronto, ON, Canada
Testimonials


Carter County Emergency & Rescue Squad, Inc., Elizabethton, TN, U.S.A.


University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA, U.S.A.


U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, Dublin, GA, U.S.A.


Croft Rescue Squad, Spartanburg, SC, U.S.A.


Lenoir Memorial Hospital, Kinston, NC, U.S.A.


Dunn Rescue Squad, Inc., Dunn, NC, U.S.A.

Jefferson County EMS, Dandridge, TN, U.S.A.
Oxylator® FR-300
Introduction
Brochure (PDF)
Operating Manual (PDF)
Usage Guide
Photographs
Publications


Patents, Approvals, and Clearances
Case Studies


St. Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg, NL (PDF)

University of Massachussetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, U.S.A. (PDF)
Oxylator® EMX
Introduction
Brochure (PDF)
Operating Manual (PDF)
Usage Guide
Photographs
Publications

Patents, Approvals, and Clearances
Oxylator® HD
Introduction
Brochure (PDF)
Operating Manual (PDF)
Photographs
Publications
Case Studies


St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada (PDF)

Patents, Approvals, and Clearances
Distributors
Demonstration Videos
Brochures
Oxylator® EM-100 (PDF)
Oxylator® FR-300 (PDF)
Oxylator® EMX (PDF)
Oxylator® HD (PDF)
Operating Manuals
Oxylator® EM-100 (PDF)
Oxylator® FR-300 (PDF)
Oxylator® EMX (PDF)
Oxylator® HD (PDF)
Usage Guides
Oxylator® FR-300 (PDF)
Oxylator® EMX (PDF)
Publications
Oxylator® EM-100
Oxylator® FR-300
Oxylator® EMX
Oxylator® HD
Case Studies
Oxylator® EM-100


St. Gallen Cantonal Hospital, Switzerland (PDF)


Hospital Princeps d'Espanya Bellvitge, Barcelona, Spain


Royal Victoria Hospital and McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada


Montérégie's EMS System, Longueil, QC, Canada


NTV a Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Anesthesi- medewerkers, Netherlands


Helicopter Emergency Medical Services, University Hospital Rotterdam, Netherlands


University of Massachussetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA, U.S.A.


Emergency Scientific Medical Center, Yerevan, Armenia

CPR Medical Devices, Inc., Toronto, ON, Canada
Oxylator® FR-300


St. Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg, NL (PDF)

University of Massachussetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, U.S.A. (PDF)
Oxylator® HD
St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada (PDF)
Testimonials
Oxylator® EM-100

Carter County Emergency & Rescue Squad, Inc., Elizabethton, TN, U.S.A.

University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA, U.S.A.

U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, Dublin, GA, U.S.A.

Croft Rescue Squad, Spartanburg, SC, U.S.A.

Lenoir Memorial Hospital, Kinston, NC, U.S.A.

Dunn Rescue Squad, Inc., Dunn, NC, U.S.A.
Jefferson County EMS, Dandridge, TN, U.S.A.
Distributors
Demonstration Videos
News and Newsworthy

Helicopter Emergency Medical Services, University Hospital Rotterdam, Netherlands
REA 2000, Ostschweizer Bildungsaustellung, St. Gallen, Switzerland
Downloads
Brochures
Operating Manuals
Usage Guides
Publications
Demonstration Videos
FAQs
Acknowledgments
Site Map
Contact

Features
Oxylator® outperforms bag-valve, in the European Journal of Anaesthesiology Oxylators® reviewed in the Journal of Emergency Medical Services
Oxylator® bests bag-valve in peer-review studies Oxylators® reviewed in JEMS magazine

The First Clinical Experiences with the
Oxylator® EM-100


R. C. van Urk and B. J. Teunissen


Introduction | The Oxylator® EM-100 | Evaluation Form and Results | Case Reports | Conclusions


Case Report 1

On Tuesday 22 March 1998, a 70-year-old, male patient, who was known with COPD and had been treated for a week at the pulmonary ward, was found in bed in cardiac and respiratory arrest. After starting Basic Life Support, the nursing staff alerted the resuscitation team. The patient was resuscitated according to the standards of the European Resuscitation Council adhered to in this hospital. After a short pre-oxygenation phase and intubation of the patient, artificial respiration with the Oxylator® EM-100 was administered manually (massage:ventilation ratio = 5:1). After about 10 minutes, the respiration pressure exceeded 50 mm/g, which means that the Oxylator® EM- 100 stopped hinctioning. The patient's bronchi were cleared using a suction catheter, after which respiration with the Oxylator® EM-100, with settings at 25 cmH2O and in the automatic position, was resumed. Some 15 minutes later, the patient regained a sinus rhythm and it was decided to continue his treatment in the ICU. Re was monitored during the transport by a DATEX AS3 light monitor with CO2 module, which indicated CO2 values between 3.5 and 4.5 mmHg. During the resuscitation in the patient's room, the Oxylator: EM-100 was driven by O2 from the hospital's central O2 system; for the transport, it was switched to a 2 litre O2 cylinder.


Case Report 2

An 18-year-old, male patient with an intra-cardial defibrillator was being prepared for orthopaedic surgery; induction of anaesthesia, which was expected to take a long time, was done in a preparing room where automatic respiration is not customarily available. Target Controlled infusion (propophol, esmeron and rapiphen) was used to anaesthetise the patient. Before he was intubated, manual respiration was applied via a mask with the aid of Oxylator® EM-100, using jawthrust, until the patient had reached a state of maximum relaxation. After endotracheal intubation, respiration continued with the Oxylator® EM-100 in automatic setting and at the previously set pressure of 25 cmH2O.

The preparations included the introduction of an arterial blood pressure line and a central venous catheter. The entire induction of anaesthesia and positioning took 30 minutes. In this special situation, the procedure had to be managed without major changes in the patient's blood pressure, which was successfully achieved.
  ^ Top